Pussy Riot Close Down Dismaland

Written by | September 29, 2015 7:00 am | No Comments

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Photo by Vianney Le Caer

“Pussy Riot premiered “Refugees In” at the closing of Banksy’s Dismaland exhibition on September 25th.

Moved by the distressing images of families desperately seeking safety in Europe, Pussy Riot were inspired to add their voice to those offering solidarity to refugees. “Regardless of ones political views we have a moral duty to offer refuge to people fleeing war and persecution. We recognize the challenge faced by Europe in accepting hundreds of thousands of displaced people, but this is more than a political challenge – it is a humanitarian crisis and as such we must act together and rise to the challenge. Having experienced persecution during the 2 years we spent in a Russian prison and repeated incidents of attack by Russian authorities we feel solidarity with those who suffer under oppressive regimes, and believe we have a moral duty to press governments into developing a united and comprehensive plan that puts humanity before politics.”

Pussy Riot’s Dismaland performance involved a riot between police and activists, scenes of police arresting protesters, protesters overcoming the police and a special cage that housed the performers of the song. The piece, which was a collaboration with The Connor Brothers, highlights the difference between the governments approach to the refugee crusts and the public sentiment. Their performance is the beginning of Pussy Riot’s ongoing engagement with the refugee crisis. In October, Pussy Riot intend to visit ‘The Jungle‘ refugee camp in Calais, France with British artists The Connor Brothers to offer both solidarity and practical support to those in desperate need.”

I wouldn’t have minded checking of Dismaland myself, it looked like Banksy’s finest moment, a sort of dream to nightmare anti-land, the saddest place on earth.

And as refugees from the Middle East flood Europe, it is the vague anti-everything that has occurred to cultural hegemony. We miss the past for many reason but mainly because it is, well, in the past.

Futurists such as myself believe this to be the greatest time of all but what else is new? Compared to the 1950s, if you are female, gay or black, these are golden years despite all the black lives matter stuff for North Americans. If you are Arabic, well, than it is a little less easy to claim it.

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