The Bootleg Series Vol. 12: The Cutting Edge 1965–1966, Disc Three Reviewed

Written by | November 22, 2015 6:09 | No Comments

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The first four songs are for a song that didn’t make it on Bringing It All Back Home, Manfred Mann had a hit with it, what follows that is day one of the Highway 61 Revisited Sessions and Tom Wilson’s last stand. Bob Johnston would take over production work. The backing band for June 15th was Dylan was backed by Bobby Gregg on drums, Joe Macho, Jr. on bass, Paul Griffin on piano, Frank Owens on guitar For lead guitar,  Michael Bloomfield of the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, and Tom brought in All Kooper for “Like A Rolling Stone”.

 

Disc 3
1. If You Gotta Go, Go Now – Take 1 (1/15/1965) Complete. – The bridge isn’t strong enough on this version of Dylan’s sly piece of seduction. Not crazy about the background singing either.

2. If You Gotta Go, Go Now – Take 2 (1/15/1965) Complete. – The piano really rocks on this take

3. If You Gotta Go, Go Now – Take 3 (1/15/1965) Complete. – Tom brings the band in closer and it sounds tighter, the harmonica makes its first appearance.

4. If You Gotta Go, Go Now – Take 4 (1/15/1965) Released on The Bootleg Series, Vol. 1-3, 1991. – Here you go, even the backing vocals are there.

5. It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry – Take 1 (6/15/1965) Complete. – The first take on the first day of one of the greatest albums of all time, but nothing recorded this day made it on the album. This is too bluesy. “Number Cloudy” Tom jokes. Little does he know. The harp is all their.

6. It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry – Takes 2-3 (6/15/1965) Fragments. “Go ahead, I don’t know how to start the song”.

7. It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry – Take 4 (6/15/1965) Breakdown.- He doesn’t have the verse down, then hits groove and doesn’t know where to go with it

8. It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry – Takes 5 (6/15/1965) False start. – He doesn’t have it yet but the vocals on this one are pretty stupendous

9. It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry – Takes 6 (6/15/1965) Breakdown. – Yikes, his phrasing is all wrong and the song isn’t there yet.

10. It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry – Take 7 (6/15/1965) Insert. – Like 50 seconds, dunno why exactly

11. It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry – Take 8 (6/15/1965) Complete. – Hey, this is fine but the song isn’t finished and he knew it, though he finally gets “if I die on top of the hill” down, but it is too fast and the tune isn’t there.

12. It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry – Take 9 (6/15/1965) Released on The Bootleg Series, Vol. 7, 2005. – Still not there, so he stops and moves on.

13. Sitting On A Barbed-Wire Fence – Take 1 (6/15/1965) Rehearsal and breakdown. – We don’t get many rehearsals so it is a pleasure to hear him direct the band on a frankly iffy song.

14. Sitting On A Barbed-Wire Fence – Take 2 (6/15/1965) Complete. – This has nifty harp to bring you on but really, as Dylan notes, it’s just a riff going nowhere.

15. Sitting On A Barbed-Wire Fence – Take 3 (6/15/1965) Released on The Bootleg Series, Vol. 1-3, 1991. – If it wasn’t for the fact we knew the session wouldn’t get any better this mess might be charming: they’re happily jamming to start but once the song kicks in they still don’t have it down.

16. Sitting On A Barbed-Wire Fence – Take 2 (6/15/1965) Edited version. Complete. – Meh, there is a reason this didn’t make it on the album.

17. It Takes A Lot to Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry – Take 1 remake (6/15/1965) Released on The Bootleg Series, Vol. 1-3, 1991. – Back to a song that hasn’t clicked yet.

18. Sitting On A Barbed-Wire Fence – Takes 4-5 (6/15/1965) False starts.- Over the cliffs? And if Tom whistles just one more time…

19. Sitting On A Barbed-Wire Fence – Take 6 (6/15/1965) Complete. – what’s next? Anyone???

20. Like A Rolling Stone – Takes 1-3 (6/15/1965) Rehearsal. – I know I’m a majority of of one here, but even at this earliest or earliest takes, the song is there. The melody, the cadence. The arrangement might not be ready but the song is complete and only waiting on the right magic.

21. Like A Rolling Stone – Take 4 (6/15/1965) Rehearsal. Partially released on The Bootleg Series Vol. 1-3, 1991. – Yes absolutely a waltz and well, yes the melody need just a touch but really it is pretty close.
22. Like A Rolling Stone – Take 5 (6/15/1965) Breakdown. – Adds in the introduction and loses the band.

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